16 4 / 2014

"Don’t wait. The time will never be just right. -Napoleon Hill"

15 4 / 2014


As a blogger who has a disability, who is short, who cannot claim to be skinny, who grapples with both the privilege I have and the privilege I don’t, I continually wonder when the day will come that I will see myself reflected back at me, not just in this one documentary, but in the mainstream media as a whole. Within the vast world of bloggers, I have connected with countless people who share amazing stories. They are the stories of what it’s really like to have a disability. They are the stories of how it feels to not fit in to a certain cultural norm. They are the stories of personal struggles and triumphs, regardless of appearance or ability. [read more]

As a blogger who has a disability, who is short, who cannot claim to be skinny, who grapples with both the privilege I have and the privilege I don’t, I continually wonder when the day will come that I will see myself reflected back at me, not just in this one documentary, but in the mainstream media as a whole. Within the vast world of bloggers, I have connected with countless people who share amazing stories. They are the stories of what it’s really like to have a disability. They are the stories of how it feels to not fit in to a certain cultural norm. They are the stories of personal struggles and triumphs, regardless of appearance or ability. [read more]

14 4 / 2014

"My family has a vehicle adapted so I can get inside, but sometimes I just want to take a drive with my friends. Since it took me longer to get my driver’s license than most of my peers and I’m still working on getting a vehicle with the equipment I need to drive, my current options for transportation when going out are either to be driven by my father or to be picked up by a friend. While I’m thankful that my friends are always up for letting me hitch a ride, transferring to the passenger seat used to be a two person acrobatic performance." [read more]

14 4 / 2014

I was writing an article last night and got a kick out of this sentence when I realized it’s unintentionally punny: “Too often, people use the term ‘wheelchair-bound’ to refer to wheelchair users – a term that I personally can’t stand.”

13 4 / 2014

andreashettle:

professionaldaydreamer2:

I want to diversify what’s on my dash. Recommend me some cool disability blogs? Anything that isn’t a spoonie-type chronic illness blog. (I just already have plenty and know where to find more if i want more. Looking to mix things up.)

I do blog and re blog a lot on disability.  I am deaf and have attention deficit disorder, but I tend to be interested in a lot of cross disability stuff.  Since I do a lot of re-blogging, you can discover more disability Tumblr blogs via mine.

I like http://youneedacat.tumblr.com … she does have some chronic conditions but also some other disabilities, e.g is autistic  I first discovered her via http://ballastexistenz.wordpress.com

You can find more deaf bloggers via http://deafread.com

The Disability Studies blog at Temple U has an extensive blog roll of many different bloggers with disabilities, check the left hand side: http://disstud.blogspot.com/

Every year, there is a major event on May 1st called Blogging Against Disablism Day in which usually more than 100 bloggers (mostly people with disabilities) blog about ableism/disablism.  Browsing through some of the entries that have been submitted to this over the years can help lead you to many more disability bloggers, though not all are on Tumblr.  Check the archives for 2013200620072008200920102011 and 2012.  Speaking of which, the May 1st date for the 2014 BADD event should be coming soon!  Watch Diary of a Goldfish blog for details that I’m sure will be coming soon.

I focus on disability as well! And I’m guessing you might already be following, but I highly recommend hellomynameismaddy and i-need-that-seat.

Also check out sweetmobility and ollibean!

12 4 / 2014

mylifeasafeminista:

daily reminder that it is okay to put yourself first

(via wheeliewifee)

11 4 / 2014

andreashettle:

jottingitalldown:

Was reminiscing with my sister remembering weird things people have said, couldn’t help but laugh. Here’s a few to remember:

"Do you know that you’re in an academic class?"

A supply teacher back in high school english. After that, I proceeded to read out loud during “silent time” for the remainder of class, purposely mispronouncing every single word.

"You speak very well for someone in a wheelchair."

A student before math class. I told him my speech wasn’t affected by my disability, and he debated with me about how “some people in wheelchairs do though”.

"She not a real student that gets grades, just wears the uniform and goes to class for fun."

A random girl in high school I overheard talking to her friend and pointing to me (whom I’ve never met before).

"Watch where you’re going or she’ll run you over!"

A concerned mom at the mall literally yanking her kid away. I wasn’t even 6 ft near them.

"Hey look! They can’t walk you know."

A girl whispering to her friend in the library, pointing to my sister and I. In return, I pointed to them and whispered to my sister “Hey look! They can walk you know”.

"You could be healed with prayer, Jesus always performs miracles."

Some preacher after a funeral mass. Because apparently being in a wheelchair means there’s something wrong with you, and it needs to be fixed.

"You smell nice" *turns to my mother* “They smell really nice!”

Some old guy at the grocery store. I guess he was trying to compliment my mom’s ability to keep us clean? So creeped out.

Re, speaking well for someone in a wheelchair: 

[Sarcasm mode = On]: But didn’t you know that all people who use a wheelchair share the same disability?  You’ll all in wheelchairs!  The wheelchair is your disability!  See?!!  Therefore, there is every reason to believe that every wheelchair rider are all affected by the same things in the same ways! Because you’re all basically the same!  [Sarcasm mode = Off]

Apparently this was someone who does not understand that cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, spinal cord injury, spina bifida, MS, fibromygalia, above-knee amputation of both legs, osteogensis imperfecta, and all the other conditions that can (for at least some portion of the people affected by each impairment) can all lead to the need for a wheelchair whether part time or full time.  And that these conditions may not necessarily share much else in common (including symptoms) other than the wheelchair.  Oh, and that the wheelchair is not itself a disability, it’s an assistive device that *enables* a person to do things their impairment and the poor, and discriminatory design of their environment might otherwise prevent.  Thus, the wheelchair is almost the OPPOSITE of disability.  All of which should be as obvious as being hit over the head with an anvil, immediately followed with a flashing neon sign in their face.  But apparently some people seem to need that sort of thing spelled out to them.  *Sigh*  

Re, you whispering to your sister, “Hey look, they can walk you know” … you’re awesome!  Go, you!  I usually only think of these things much later, alas … !

Re, Jesus and miracles: I was once told by a Buddhist woman that sometimes people who convert to Buddhism “get their hearing back”. [Sarcasm mode = On] Gosh, maybe I should have given that a try. [Sarcasm mode = Off]  I don’t ride a wheelchair.  So I’ve no idea if she would have said something similar to you.  Probably.  Or so I suppose.  

Maybe we should do a scientific experiment: One of us could convert to Christianity and the other to Buddhism for a week to see what happens to our assorted impairments.  Then the next week, we could trade places.  Except, oh dear, I’m not sure if false conversion for the purpose of scientific experimentation would really count for the purpose.

I wish I got a quarter every time I heard one of these comments.

I’ll also add one of my particular least favorites: "You got a license for that thing?" - People everywhere all the time when I’m out living my life.

11 4 / 2014

buffkitten:

i-need-that-seat:

she-rocks-and-she-rolls:

“”Can you move them over there?’ It was such an innocent question. The woman volunteering as an usher looked at the only one in my group of friends who doesn’t use a wheelchair or a walker, hoping he would herd us, “them,” to the back of the lobby to get out of the way for other people using mobility aids. My friend doesn’t appear to have a physical disability when he’s just standing still, so the usher directed her request at him as though he was our chaperone. And while this simple, blatant ableism so often renders me speechless until I come up with the perfect reply in the middle of the night, I just wasn’t willing to sit there and take it that day.” [read more]

Girl, you did the right thing by speaking up. Next time, hopefully, she’ll think twice about her word choice.

Speaking as one who has been called out on ableist BS in the past; thank you.
Yes, I was embarrassed when called out. Good. I deserved it, I learned from it, and I’m a better person for it.Hopefully. She will be too.

That’s such a fantastic perspective. Even having a disability, I’ve been called on unintentional ableism a time or two, so I understand from both sides. Life is such a learning process, even if that sounds super cliche.

buffkitten:

i-need-that-seat:

she-rocks-and-she-rolls:

“”Can you move them over there?’ It was such an innocent question. The woman volunteering as an usher looked at the only one in my group of friends who doesn’t use a wheelchair or a walker, hoping he would herd us, “them,” to the back of the lobby to get out of the way for other people using mobility aids. My friend doesn’t appear to have a physical disability when he’s just standing still, so the usher directed her request at him as though he was our chaperone. And while this simple, blatant ableism so often renders me speechless until I come up with the perfect reply in the middle of the night, I just wasn’t willing to sit there and take it that day.” [read more]

Girl, you did the right thing by speaking up. Next time, hopefully, she’ll think twice about her word choice.

Speaking as one who has been called out on ableist BS in the past; thank you.

Yes, I was embarrassed when called out. Good. I deserved it, I learned from it, and I’m a better person for it.Hopefully. She will be too.

That’s such a fantastic perspective. Even having a disability, I’ve been called on unintentional ableism a time or two, so I understand from both sides. Life is such a learning process, even if that sounds super cliche.

11 4 / 2014

11 4 / 2014

i-need-that-seat:

she-rocks-and-she-rolls:

“”Can you move them over there?’ It was such an innocent question. The woman volunteering as an usher looked at the only one in my group of friends who doesn’t use a wheelchair or a walker, hoping he would herd us, “them,” to the back of the lobby to get out of the way for other people using mobility aids. My friend doesn’t appear to have a physical disability when he’s just standing still, so the usher directed her request at him as though he was our chaperone. And while this simple, blatant ableism so often renders me speechless until I come up with the perfect reply in the middle of the night, I just wasn’t willing to sit there and take it that day.” [read more]

Girl, you did the right thing by speaking up. Next time, hopefully, she’ll think twice about her word choice.

Here’s hoping it was at least a teachable moment, right?! :)

i-need-that-seat:

she-rocks-and-she-rolls:

“”Can you move them over there?’ It was such an innocent question. The woman volunteering as an usher looked at the only one in my group of friends who doesn’t use a wheelchair or a walker, hoping he would herd us, “them,” to the back of the lobby to get out of the way for other people using mobility aids. My friend doesn’t appear to have a physical disability when he’s just standing still, so the usher directed her request at him as though he was our chaperone. And while this simple, blatant ableism so often renders me speechless until I come up with the perfect reply in the middle of the night, I just wasn’t willing to sit there and take it that day.” [read more]

Girl, you did the right thing by speaking up. Next time, hopefully, she’ll think twice about her word choice.

Here’s hoping it was at least a teachable moment, right?! :)